Friday, December 2, 2016

It was a good week

Some weeks are good, some darn good, but this one was a very damn good one : grandson Evan passed his test and is now a licensed nurse, Tom and Gail Carroll stopped in to see Connie and me, and in midweek, brother in law, Sandy -one putt - Burton, his wife, Phyllis- Connie's sister- their daughter, Wendy and friend Steve stopped by for a visit. All seemed well by being here down in sunny Florida with all the other visiting snowbirds. There are reasons some weeks are better than others.
It was a good week

Some weeks are good, some darn good, but this one was a very damn good one : grandson Evan passed his test and is now a licensed nurse, Tom and Gail Carroll stopped in to see Connie and me, and in midweek, brother in law, Sandy -one putt - Burton, his wife, Phyllis- Connie's sister- their daughter, Wendy and friend Steve stopped by for a visit. All seemed well by being here down in sunny Florida with all the other visiting snowbirds. There are reasons some weeks are better than others.

Friday, November 25, 2016

A Song By Whitman

"Afoot and light hearted, I take to the open road,.. "Song of the Open Road by Walt Whitman engages my mind each time I see this commercial and hear these words on television. To get a more lasting reason for remembering this poem, pull it up and hear it read aloud taking about ten minutes.

Whitman lived in an earlier century but words of his wisdom erupt in valuable thoughts no matter the century they were written in. Walt's poems are best appreciated when read aloud because, by that, the cadence of his composition shines through. To me, his beat hammers throughout his works and sets him off against most other poets of his time. The art form of his poetics once revered by multitudes has withered over time but thanks to this commercial poetry has begun a resurgence. Maybe poetry will be used more as year go by to sell products, or at least, I hope so.

Ronald C. Downie
A Song By Whitman

"Afoot and light hearted, I take to the open road,.. "Song of the Open Road by Walt Whitman engages my mind each time I see this commercial and hear these words on television. To get a more lasting reason for remembering this poem, pull it up and hear it read aloud taking about ten minutes.

Whitman lived in an earlier century but words of his wisdom erupt in valuable thoughts no matter the century they were written in. Walt's poems are best appreciated when read aloud because, by that, the cadence of his composition shines through. To me, his beat hammers throughout his works and sets him off against most other poets of his time. The art form of his poetics once revered by multitudes has withered over time but thanks to this commercial poetry has begun a resurgence. Maybe poetry will be used more as year go by to sell products, or at least, I hope so.

Ronald C. Downie

Friday, November 18, 2016

"Gods, Wasps and Stranglers"

The author, Mike Shanahan, mesmerized me this week as I read his book, "Gods, Wasps and Stranglers" - the secret history and redemptive future of fig trees - in a few days of utter enjoyment. Stuck in the mud, was I, not having opened a book for months let alone some years. The iPad does this to you. It becomes too easy to surf Facebook daily thinking, now I know it all, what else is there ? There is a whole world of books out there just waiting to be opened to all with a receptive, inquisitive mind.

Ronnie, my son, called from Pottstown to me in Florida, saying a book was coming in the mail. Further, he said, this book got rave reviews from Mike McGrath on his radio show, "You Bet Your Garden", a radio show we both enjoyed for years.

Eighty million years older than our human ancestors the fig tree has been the sustainer of life its entire existence. The author weaves the history of figs into the fabric of man's existence and hopes today man can see through the many missteps his lust for open fields have laid waste the need for diversity among plant species. Along the way, figs have been worshiped by diverse tribes on different continents. The act of worship is one of the highest calling primitive man can muster up in his slow journey on the accent of civilization.

Ronald C. Downie